Journal Entries - JoshVC30/TECH190_Journals Wiki

Journal Entry 1, 9/1/2022, Joshua Vazquez Correa

What have you learned from watching recent development in game & simulation development?

  • I researched Unreal Engine 5's Nanite. Nanite makes objects in the foreground have higher poly counts than the objects in the background. This makes it so that developers can feel free to put as many hi-def objects as the want and not have to worry about storage or memory because the software will constantly be adjusting poly counts to be as efficient as possible while still keeping a high quality image for the player. This feature truly revolutionizes game development because it makes mundane tasks like having to make low-poly models for far away objects and switching them out when the player gets close a thing of the past.

https://logicsimplified.com/newgames/unreal-5-nanite-and-lumen-technology-for-next-gen-games/

What have you learned on Unity?

  • I wanted to learn how to use Unity so I searched up a tutorial on how to do simple 2d player movements like going side to side and jumping. After finishing the first tutorial I learned how to code the movements, how to create 2D objects, as well as basic knowledge of the Unity UI.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcranVQUQ5U&list=PLBJrDiVI22pwnj34vY-2gYk9ci0jtQfKW&index=3

What issues you encountered and how can we addressed them?

  • Some issues came up while working on this. One was that for some reason Visual Studios was not connecting to Unity, but turns out I needed to go into the edit tab in Unity and set the proper Visual Studios version and it got fixed. Another issue I came across was that when I coded the player to move left and right it didn't work for some reason when I played it, but turns out I just needed to change a value that was preset to zero in the Unity Inspector and I was able to move and jump.

Journal Entry 2, 9/8/2022, Joshua Vazquez Correa

What have you learned from watching recent development in game & simulation development?

  • The newest trend in game purchasing is game subscription services. Just like Netflix or Disney+, a number of companies have adopted that model where by making a monthly payment you are able to download and play as many games as you want from their library. Some of the most popular and successful platforms are Microsoft's XBOX GamePass, Sony's PlayStation Now, and EA Access. Some companies go about this subscription model slightly different and offer different services on top of being able to play from their games. For example Nintendo Switch Online has a similar monthly subscription service, but within that service they include access to their online services and retro games. This is great for the consumer because not everyone is able to afford every game they would wanna play, but with this subscription service model for a single monthly payment you are given access to hundreds of games that you can play and try them out whenever you like.

https://entertainment-focus.com/2022/06/06/why-are-subscription-services-popular-in-the-gaming-industry/

What have you learned on Unity?

  • While playing with the character I made I wasn't really happy with the camera being stationary, so I decided to learn how to make it so that the camera follows the character. After following a tutorial I figured out how to make the camera follow the character by using a camera script with c#. I also found out about a unity package called Cinemachine and I intend to learn about that and work with it in the actual game.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QnPY6hw8pA&t=522s

What issues you encountered and how can we addressed them?

  • One issue I came across was that in the video tutorial the way the person made it the camera is supposed to have a slight smooth delay, but for some reason in my implementation the camera had no delay and only followed the characters exact spot. I went over the whole video multiple times and did everything as the tutorial did but nothing fixed the issue. This is why when I found out about Cinemachine and it was way more convenient because it didn't involve scripting so I decided to work with that camera package instead.